TV & Radio

R_main_call_communion_14 (1)I can be heard Monday through Friday 1 PM (Central) and Sunday at 1 PM (rebroadcast) on the EWTN Gobal Catholic Radio Network, where I host the program Called to Communion.

(Archives and live streaming are available here.)

In addition, here are some video recordings I have done:

Journey Home 2-08-2010

Journey Home Open Line

EWTN Live

Deep in Scripture

Birmingham Catechetical Institute

45 thoughts on “TV & Radio

  1. Reply
    Eileen Schuster - December 24, 2013

    David, Excellent show on Journey Home this evening. Thank you for your witness. I will start reading your articles on your website. Christmas Blessings to you and your family. Eileen

  2. Reply
    John - December 24, 2013

    I love it when you are on the JH!

  3. Reply
    m.e.graham m.d. - December 24, 2013

    Thank you very much for your time Dec.23

  4. Reply
    J. C. - December 24, 2013

    David, I was extremely impressed with your witness on EWTN programs. I am a late convert to Catholicism at the age of 54. I now see that we live in a protestant country that has lost its moral compass. After birth control was ok’d by Anglicans in 1930, it was predicted by Catholic hierarchy that soon to follow would be abortion & disintegration of the family. Yet Protestants I know still defend their tendency for marriage & remarriage, at will. There is little or no accountability in regard to subsequent adulterous unions. So it’s no wonder why other taboo behavior has gotten a hold on our society. Your thoughts?

  5. Reply
    josephforry - January 2, 2014

    Dr. Anders,
    You were supah on the Journey home the other night… Come back again Between You and Marcus my cradle Catholicism is uplifted.. Truly wonderful discussions Sincerely joe forry

  6. Reply
    Joe Blaine - January 7, 2014

    Dr. Anders,
    I want to let you know how much I appreciate your program on EWTN Live, especially in light of some recent negative criticism you received. You give thorough, clear and direct answers. I believe you are greatly under-utilized and should have much more air time to reach as many people as possible. I plan to download all of your programs. Your Protestant background is very beneficial, and you are a very powerful witness to non-Catholics, but I think your work is even more important to Catholics. Explaining our faith by contrasting it to what non-Catholics believe is an excellent way to inform Catholics about our faith. We are very fortunate to have such great apologists as you, James Akins, and Patrick Madrid.
    Since on your January 2 program you were speculating on what a personal relationship with Christ meant for Protestants compared to Catholics, I thought you might be interested in some feedback from a Catholic who thinks this subject is of the utmost importance. I believe this concept is synonymous with one’s life in Christ and is the heart and center of a Christian’s life. I believe we have a personal relationship with Christ through prayer, reception of the sacraments, being aware of God’s active presence and grace in us at all times and our necessary response to that life by striving to know, love and serve God and our neighbor to help ourselves and others to become more “Christ like”.
    The foundation of this relationship is the Holy Eucharist and the “principal fruit of receiving the Eucharist in Holy Communion is an intimate union with Christ Jesus.” (CCC 1391). In addition, by receiving in the Eucharist Christ’s entire presence, physical and spiritual, that we can touch and feel, it is invaluable in assisting us in being aware of His spiritual presence, that we have within us at all times, in this relationship. “The Eucharist is ‘the source and summit of the Christian life.’”(CCC 1324), but we can spend very little time living at the summit. We should spend the rest of our lives not far below the summit in the highlands of God’s presence, within us, in a relationship with Christ to serve God and our neighbor.
    Concerning the negative criticism you received from a re- airing of a previous television appearance, I was only surprised you did not generate more criticism. I have never heard anybody give such a concise summation and refutation of the doctrines of Protestantism in such little time as you did. Unfortunately, it was bound to bother some Protestants. There is one other tenet of the reformers, that is part of their justification doctrine, that I have found to be more of an obstacle than “faith alone” justification, with my non-Catholic friends – Luther and Calvin’s belief in the total depravity of man to the point of denying free will. With this doctrine, Luther undermined many of the practices of the Church, that centered on true sanctification/transformation, and the meaning and purpose of important aspects of life such as suffering. In fact, I have wondered without this doctrine if Luther would have developed his novel idea of justification by faith alone.
    Due to clear biblical evidence, my Protestant friends have rejected the “faith alone” doctrine. We have agreed that one is saved by a “saving faith”, one that accepts Christ and all that He commands (obedience) including loving and serving God and neighbor, which requires works. They agree that there are consequences to our actions. We must persevere in grace by striving to be obedient through our deeds; otherwise, we have in effect rejected Christ, and our salvation will be lost.
    My non-Catholic friends have also rejected the concept of total depravity and have accepted free will and that man has the limited ability of cooperating with grace, but they have not accepted transformation or regeneration. I know some Protestants, like Church of Christ, believe in regeneration and many other individuals do, but it still appears our different views on sanctification is a major divide between Catholics and Protestants. However, I think there is great potential for unity on this issue for those who are not hostile towards the Church. I think the biblical evidence for transformation at justification and the command to pursue real sanctification afterwards is very strong, and their concept of “behavioral justification” is very weak to address the Bible’s command to pursue sanctification. In addition, I think people would be inclined to be open to the Catholic doctrine, since people have a natural desire to believe they can become better.
    I think the more we learn about Protestant beliefs, the better we can show the strength of the Catholic view. That is another benefit of your ministry, in that it helps us better understand our non-Catholic brothers and sisters in the faith. I have several Protestant friends whom I feel spiritually very close to and I have tried to learn as much as possible about their beliefs so I can better present the Catholic view if they are interested. My reward is it never fails that every time I learn more about the Protestant faith my appreciation, faith in, and love for the richness of the Catholic faith increases.
    Thank you for your ministry, and I hope and pray that God continues to bless you in it.
    Yours in Christ,
    Joe Blaine

    1. Reply
      David Anders - January 10, 2014

      Hi Joe,

      Thanks for the kind words.

      -David

  7. Reply
    Mary - January 13, 2014

    Saw you on Journey Home through the EWTN YouTube website.
    So very thankful that I watched. Your clarification between Protestant and Catholic understanding of original sin was so helpful for me. As a convert, I’ve been trying to find a resource that could clear up and explain the differences. I’ve read a number of books that say they explain it, but your voice on JH was the only time I understood. Praise Jesus for your excellent teaching.

    1. Reply
      David Anders - January 15, 2014

      Thank you, Mary, for your kind words.
      God bless!

      David

  8. Reply
    Peter Gelinas - April 12, 2014

    Hi Dr. David,
    I enjoyed hearing you for the first time on April 10 open line. It was inspiring to hear your scope of knowledge about Catholic/Christianity, your commentary relevant to modern issues, and your unique perspectives. Please consider a link to Face Book to reach a wider audience. God bless you and yours.

  9. Reply
    Reggie Lovero - April 20, 2014

    Dr. Anders,

    I just want to say that I just came into full communion with the Church this past Holy Thursday. Thank for you work, it has been a helpful guide into my conversion.

    I’m currently dialoging with some Protestant friends about my conversion. The issue of denominationalism came up, and I mentioned that even John Calvin opposed such a thing. I remember listening to you on Catholic Answers and I think I recall you saying that Calvin thought that people were treating the scriptures to fit their ‘own tastes’. You mentioned “faces of coin” I know thats vague but it was an important point that you made and I would like to share it with my friends. I was wondering if you have any quotes by the Calvin and other Reformers that admonishes what we see today in 21century Protestantism? Specifically, the vast number of denominations.

    Thank you again. I throughly appreciate your work.

    Reggie Lovero

    1. Reply
      David Anders - April 22, 2014

      Hi Reggie,

      Thanks for the note. Congratulations on your reception into the Church!
      For Calvin quotes, see my article “How John Calvin made me a Catholic.” I have one about “denominations” in there.

      -David

  10. Reply
    Liza - May 1, 2014

    Hello Dr. Anders,

    I wish you all the best and you family hope more blessing to come.
    I watched your video on Journey Home and it really helped me a lot to read more about my faith. I was taught well about my Faith when i was in High School by Nuns….but after high school i did not really study more because I was busy studying and working and then at the age 23 leave my country to work overseas ,by the way I came from the Philippines and now living in Canada for almost a 2 years now .Hearing your conversion make me happy and also awaken my longing to read more about Our faith and looking forward to teach my family too they are not really knowledgeable about the Church teaching but they very faithful Catholic especially my grandparents .

    God Bless …

    Liza

    1. Reply
      David Anders - May 1, 2014

      Thank you, Liza.

      Blessings,

      David

  11. Reply
    Reggie Lovero - May 15, 2014

    Dr. Anders,

    In a discussion with a Protestant friend about the nature of the Eucharist and the differences between Luther, Calvin and Zwingli, I made mention, that Calvin taught that a proper understanding of the Eucharist was necessary for salvation. He responded by saying the following, “If you mean this, then you are claiming that Calvin denied that Luther was saved. This is false.”

    Would Calvin be inconsistent in this way ? Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated, kind sir.

  12. Reply
    Vicki Kirsch - May 23, 2014

    David,
    You have the most concise, thorough explanations I’ve ever heard. I’m Catholic and like the gentleman above stated, Catholics can learn so much from what you say to non-Catholics. I also appreciate the fact that you never laugh at people’s questions or get angry. Some of the other apologists do and that’s turned me off to listening to them. There’s a tendency for those who feel they are intellects in God’s word at times to go a little too far in their attitude about themselves. You are definitely not one of them. Thank you for all the knowledge you give to us.

    1. Reply
      David Anders - May 23, 2014

      Thank you so much, Vicki!

      -David

  13. Reply
    RDL in GA - July 29, 2014

    You were absolutely the best witness on Seize the Day, Monday, July 28th. Your explanations of your conversion were intelligent and clear. It strengthened my love of Catholicism. I am now a fan and will be listening to EWTN every Thursday for your show. Can’t wait to dig into the archives for your past shows. If you’re speaking anywhere in Georgia, please email me.

    1. Reply
      David Anders - July 29, 2014

      RDL – Thank you so much for your feedback. I really appreciate it.

      God bless,

      David

  14. Reply
    Tim Mc - September 4, 2014

    Hi,
    Where can I download and/or listen to the achieves of the radio show “called to communion”?
    Thanks,
    Tim

    1. Reply
      David Anders - September 4, 2014
  15. Reply
    Ryan - September 5, 2014

    Oh no! I went to listen to Open Line this Thursday and it wasn’t you! I must have missed something. I hope you continue to work in evangelization & apologetics. I’m a cradle Catholic and I learned so much from listening to you. My favorite is your explanation of Jesus’ plan for the propagation of the Faith. So logical and clear and easily to show from the Bible. Thanks!

    1. Reply
      David Anders - September 5, 2014

      Thanks!

      New Show: Called to Communion, Tuesday to Thursday, 2:00 Eastern.

      -David

      1. Reply
        Christina - September 28, 2015

        Dear Dr Anders,
        Greetings from Singapore. I enjoy your teaching on air and want to thank you and ewtn for the great work you do to clarify our Catholuc faith. One question that I hope you can clarify concerns the fallen Angels. Is it a one time fall at the beginning of creation (Satan brought one third of the Angels down with him) or do good Angels fall out today even as we speak? What do the other order of Angels do (apart from the Guardian n ArchAngels)? Thank you n Please continue your gifted teaching!

  16. Reply
    Christopher - September 25, 2014

    Dear Dr. Anders,
    Congratulations on your new radio program, “Called To Communion”, but I will miss your segment on Open Line Thursday, The discussions at times from callers would get a little heated, but I thoroughly enjoyed them, and although I’m a pretty good defender of my faith, it really helped me along the way with some issues I had trouble explaining and defending. I’ll try to tune to “Called To Communion”. But again, I’ll miss all the debates and spirited discussions on Open Line. God bless.

  17. Reply
    Christine - November 9, 2014

    I love your called to communion show . I am a convert from CofE came in officially 8 years ago but I have a question that I grappled with as to whom I could ask for an explanation and because it is long I thought I wod post here and perhaps catch your answer on the radio .
    In Acts 1: 12-22 I am again struck by something that I don’t believe I have ever heard any discussion on. The fact that There were not just 11 men in the upper room but ” in all about 120″ including women and Mary the morther of Jesus. Peter says that Judas had been “” allotted his share in this ministry” ( by Jesus) and then Peter says that they should pick someone to replace Judas from the men who were with them from the Batisim of John . This therefore indicates to me 3 very clear things. 1) that the 12 really did have a very special and set apart ministry by Jesus . We know for example that at one point in the Gospel Jesus sent out 70 disciples to spread the good news , cast out demons and heal the sick ,so they were clearly appointed by Jesus for a healing ministry and to share the gospel- why did peter think that Judas’ ” office” should be replaced and for what purpose? 2) there were about 120 people including Mary and I assume the sisters of Lazarus, whom we know was a dearly beloved friend of Jesus. So wouldnt that have been a perfect oppertunity for Peter to suggest that it ought to be Mary the mother of Jesus or the sisters of Lazarus or some other woman? 3) if 120 people were following Jesus from the Baptisim of Jesus by John in the Jordan then I presume they too were baptised in the Jordan at that time and that was the 1 st moment they would have known that Jesus was indeed someone who God said was His son so werent they all witneses , couldnt they all spred the good news and indeed I am sure they did bring many to Christ. So when they picked Matthaias to replace Judas Isxariot. He was selected for a purpose greater than just preaching the Gospel or even speaking in toungs , casting out demons and healing the sick for as we read at the end of Mark that is the sign that will acompany believers MK 16: 17,18. (Which if I read that alone I must think of myself as not being much of a believer). So what exactly is supposed to be different or special about the 12? Not to mention the matter of Paul!!! Who God clearly appointed .
    Hope you can help untangle the machinations of my brain . May God bless you . Thank you

  18. Reply
    Wilfredo Cruz - March 23, 2015

    Hi David
    My name is Wilfredo Cruz. I love your show I started to listen your show about a 3 weeks ago on 1060 am now I’m hook on. I’m original from Puerto Rico but I live in Lawrence MA. My half brother became Jehova witnesses and he try for everyone to follow him, but I feel like I don’t like the idea. I’m catholic and also my grandpa and I were talking about that the way they teach is to put the catholic down. My question is Jehova witnesses are they like Protestant?

    1. Reply
      Annie - April 27, 2015

      I just wanted to say I truly appreciate your radio show called “Called to Communion.” Fallen away Catholic are an epidemic and I love your passionate apologetics! God bless you and yours always and, please, keep up the good work. annie

      1. Reply
        David Anders - April 28, 2015

        Thanks Annie!!

        -David

  19. Reply
    Annonymous - May 12, 2015

    Hi Dr. Anders,
    I was watching the series “Deadly Journeys of the Apostles” on the National Geographics channel and saw the episode regarding the Armenian Church. I understood the Armenian Church, which is not catholic, to be the oldest Christian church. If this is true, how can it be that the Catholic Church is the first church established by Jesus Christ? Can you please explain the chronology regarding the establishment of the two churches, or are they of one and the same?

    Also can you please tell me where I can purchase the “bible thumpers”. I would love to have them handy for whenever I need to defend my Catholic faith.

    Thank You and God Bless You!

    Annonymous

    1. Reply
      David Anders - May 12, 2015

      Hi,

      The Armenian Church is not the oldest Church. It is the oldest national church. The Church existed in Jerusalem and then throughout the diaspora before it was accepted by the Armenians.

      -David

      1. Reply
        Charles Campise - June 17, 2015

        I heard a radio program 6-15 15 on original sin which I was surprise with the explanation, I am not sure whose program it was ? The commentator said we are not born with a sin on our soul , but a defect in our being. Please help me locate that program.
        Y.B.I.C. Charles Campise 713 294 9172
        3407 Erin Knoll Ct,
        Houston Tx.77059

  20. Reply
    Charles Campise - June 17, 2015

    I heard a program on June 15th, 2015 on the topic of original sin and would like a copy of the segment of original sin. I would appreciate some help in locating the program, because i found the explanation of original sin very enlightening. YBIC Charles Campise

  21. Reply
    Debbie - June 18, 2015

    Hi Dr. Anders,

    I have listened to your February 2010 interview 3 times now. And I love it! It is so clear and concise…it is the BEST conversion story I’ve listened to so far. And I too love your Called To Communion program. Thank you!

    I am 55 years old and just entered the Church this past Easter after a short 10 years as a Protestant. My second “husband” is none too pleased, so prayers for him are always appreciated.

    I’ve been invited by my church to give my conversion testimony and I am a bit nervous. The 315 Project (perhaps you’ve heard of them as they are based out of Atlanta?) is coming to my parish the end of this month to tape our stories. The gentleman who runs this Program is a Southern Baptist, but I’ve been assured I can tell my story as it is. If you could also pray for me in this, I would so covet your prayers.

    Thanks again and God Bless,

    Debbie

  22. Reply
    Vincent Varitek - August 25, 2015

    Dear David… I appreciate Call to Communion and find your insights very enlightening. A recent caller asked about a correlation between Catholic teaching and the Bible. I suggest a good answer is THE DIDACHE BIBLE
    (New American Bible) with commentaries based on the CCC. It was recently published by the Midwest Theological Forum. It also includes explanations and apologetical commentaries on numerous teachings of the faith. I understand that no single reference can possibly cover the rich history and philosophy of all church teaching, however this one has been a great help to me and I believe is a good toll for evangelization.
    Yours in Faith, Vince

  23. Reply
    M. - January 4, 2016

    I have some friends who are former or current Moonies and I can’t get through to them. Do you have any literature or information of a convert or revert from Moonie to Catholicism and how to break through the deeply entrenchment into all organized churches and what Sung Myung Moon taught and didn’t teach? They hava had apparently many scriptures that say praying for particular needs is selfish and God doesn’t like it, etc Any resources for helping ppl in cults to see the light, etc..Thank you so much,

    God Bless you,

    Anonymous

  24. Reply
    Nancy - February 16, 2016

    I am responding to a question about Jesus not having siblings. One wonders about intimacy between Mary and Joseph. Of course, how would we know?

    Several years ago, I experienced great peace and joy; totally unexpected. i was a mother of young children. My brother had drowned when I was 4 1/2. I grew up with death around me. I was terrified I might die, leaving my children motherless.

    One night I had a dream where the Blessed Mother appeared to tell me what it was like to die. I know it was a dream, but I had such amazing peace, afterward, that lasted three days. Even my internal organs were at peace. I felt such awe of Gof; loved and praised Him.

    Another time I was in church, with one of my children on each side of me. Suddenly I felt great peace come over me; a definite difference that grew stronger and stronger. I thought God was asking me to die on the spot. Being in the presence of such love and peace, I had no worries, not even for my young children. Instead of dying, a haze covered my eyes, and I looked around at people behind and along side of me. Then I heard ” Tell them, whatever they think I have against them; forget it! I love them that much!” Peace lasted through Mass and while driving to another town, about 20 minutes away. As suddenly as the Presence, which I call peace, came, it left.

    I had a dream where I was asked to chose one of two archways. One was brightly lit and had a down staircase. The other was narrow and dark. I didn’t want to go in there, but scripture says,” the road to destruction is wide, and many find it. The road to salvation is narrow….” Or something like that. I knew the dark, narrow arch was where I had to be.

    I walked in to the dark arch, about a step or two. Suddenly a new world opened up. I saw green grass and blue sky like never before. Suddenly I was at a cliff, looking down upon a city. Someone told me that city waited for me. The lion laid down with the lamb; there was no more pain or sadness…… It wasn’t time for me to enter, but I should let the revelations flow. I woke up covered with sweat, wondering if I had died for a few moments. Peace, joy, praise stayed with me, three days.

    I am a sinful human, who has had such wonderful experiences from God. Mary was visited by angel; over shadowed by the Holy Spirit; carried the Word made flesh and raised the Son of God. Joseph had dreams; helped raise the Son of God.

    Perhaps Mary and Joseph were so in love with the Son of God, and loved by the Son, they didn’t desire a life in the flesh. They lived with perfection, which none of us know. I like to think they were peaceful people, who God used to draw others to Himself.

    Cousin Elizabeth knew, after Mary’s greeting, the child within Mary was the One who had been predicted and waited for. Simon, or was it Simeon, knew at the presentation of Jesus, he had seen the Promised One. John the Baptist knew the Presence of God while in his mother’s womb, then recognized Him at the water of baptism. The woman with an issue of blood, knew to touch His garment for healing.

    I think there is a possibility that Mary and Joseph didn’t need to conceive other children, because they had been part of God’s perfect act of love. They were complete.

    Though sexual love is written about to be an ideal act of two people giving themselves to one another, in reality, it lacks. I’ve never lived perfection, or have known anyone perfect. Somehow, I think our spiritual Mother; the Arc of the Covenant, was close to being perfect and fulfilled. Joseph was not chosen by accident. He must have not only been very devout, but fulfilled.

    I’ve come close to what I thought was fulfillment, when I held my babies. My experiences as a parent were joyous, yet I was willing to give it up to be with a much greater joy; a fulfilling peace .

    When someone dies, I remember the peace that person will meet. I always console loved one’s that the person who died, cannot know anything but love in the next life.

    Thanks for letting me share.

    Nancy

  25. Reply
    Norma - May 19, 2016

    Your introduction on your radio show asks, “What’s keeping you from becoming a Catholic?” Two things. I’m 76 and now that I’ve listened to you a few months and Journey Home and went to Daily Mass for 4 months, I’ve decided I don’t have enough time to learn it all. Say what you will about the vow people take at a Graham crusade, but it’s simple and anyone can do it. The second is our Catholic friends who always seem anxious about their salvation, joyless and unhappy.

  26. Reply
    Peter - June 28, 2016

    I have a question regarding the timing of when Jesus was born. 605 of the CCC states:

    “At the end of the parable of the lost sheep Jesus recalled that God’s love excludes no one: “So it is not the will of your Father who is in heaven that one of these little ones should perish.” He affirms that he came “to give his life as a ransom for many”; this last term is not restrictive, but contrasts the whole of humanity with the unique person of the redeemer who hands himself over to save us. The Church, following the apostles, teaches that Christ died for all men without exception: “There is not, never has been, and never will be a single human being for whom Christ did not suffer.”” — I understand that this last quote comes from the Council of Quierzy.

    My question is: why didn’t Christ’s incarnation occur at some other time. God is omniscient and he is not bound by time. Thus, it would seem that he knew how his prophets would have been responded to. Why didn’t he come earlier or later?

  27. Reply
    Gloria O'Keefe - August 8, 2016

    Your program on Catholic Radio, broadcast at 2:00 P.M. Sunday, August 7th, in Indianapolis, IN, was superb.

    Do you have a tape of that program that one can purchase? I would love to have a copy if it is available. . Your answers to the questions and comments made by the callers were outstanding!

    Thank you.

  28. Reply
    Giovanni Magz - October 6, 2016

    Dr. Anders

    I am trying to send you an e-mail regarding scriptures mentioning Mary. But I can’t find your e-mail anywhere. What is a good contact for you?

    1. Reply
      Marsha Doll - February 21, 2017

      Dr. Anders: So far, when I listen to the various EWTN radio shows, I haven’t heard a very good answer
      with “clarity” <from yourself, Fr. L. Richards, or Catholic answers hosts, for the question regarding Matthew
      "call no man father". They/you, bring up the commandment: Honour Thy Father and Mother, and about
      Father Abraham, other quotes, yet, nothing with CLARITY as to this request of Jesus. There HAS to be
      a civil answer!!! I will listen on radio, again. Thank you. Marsha Doll

  29. Reply
    Rev. Richard Sudlik OMI - October 28, 2016

    Heard your comment on the death penalty the other day. Baltimore Catechism as a source? Really. Referencing the Catechism of the Catholic Church and not dismissing John Paul II might have been more helpful and more accurate a sense of where the Church is in the modern world.

  30. Reply
    Stuart - January 24, 2017

    Love your show. Not fully in communion with Church yet. You’ve answered some issues for me. There remain some problematic ones that I’m not sure you can answer, apart from simply dodging the issue with appeals to authority. On the lesser end, for instance, the Church has long employed proof-texting in official teaching documents when attempting to substantiate particulars of traditional Catholic teachings from the NT. But exegetically the NT verse or verses employed have nothing to do with the subject Catholics are trying to buttress; and any serious close examination of both the NT context and the particular texts show this to be the case. Appeals to 1 Cor. 3:10-15 in support of Purgatory is an obvious case, including the reference to burning up of work (which does not mention to burning of the individual in any sense, and can be related to other passages in scripture about people’s work being destroyed as divine punishment). More substantial problems exist, as you no doubt are aware, with the issue of divine timelessness. The entire “outside of time” assertion as a means of divine omniscience actually destroys other aspects of the classical Christian view of God, not to mention the entirety of creation (not to mention a few other problems). But the Church has traditionally (and in documents such as the CCC) cast its theological lot Augustine and Aquinas in these ideas, rather than with Molina, or other possible concepts. Additionally, logical proofs have been put forward fairly demonstrating that both timelessness and divine simplicity are not a possible perfections (and thus would not be requisite in defining the nature of the biblical God). . . . All that, as far as I can see right now (and much as I would wish it otherwise), leaves Catholic theologians and apologists simply resorting to invalid appeals to authority, and to “mystery” in the face of their problematic theology.

  31. Reply
    Phil - April 3, 2017

    Genesis 6-8

    Giants in the Land
    6 1-2 When the human race began to increase, with more and more daughters being born, the sons of God noticed that the daughters of men were beautiful. They looked them over and picked out wives for themselves.

    3 Then God said, “I’m not going to breathe life into men and women endlessly. Eventually they’re going to die; from now on they can expect a life span of 120 years.”

    4 This was back in the days (and also later) when there were giants in the land. The giants came from the union of the sons of God and the daughters of men. These were the mighty men of ancient lore, the famous ones.

    QUESTION: Who are the giants the bible is referencing? Did Giants roam the earth before? Are giants part human and part fallen angel? Please explain. Can you also email me the response in case I don’t hear it over the radio. Thanks.

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